What’s new in research: Georgetown Law Technology Review, human rights and encryption, and data protection proof free-trade agreements (open access)

I’m starting this week’s “What’s new in research” post with three good news:

  • There is a new technology law journal in town – Georgetown Law Technology Review, which was just launched. It provides full access to its articles, notes and comments. “Few issues are of greater need for careful attention today than the intersection of law and technology“, writes EPIC’s Marc Rotenberg welcoming the new Review.
  • Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology and Society (TILT) launched its Open call for Fellowships Applications for the 2017-2018 academic year. “This programme is for internationally renowned senior scholars who wish to spend the 2017- 2018 academic year, or a semester, in residence at TILT as part of its multi-disciplinary research team to work on some of the most interesting, challenging and urgent issues relating to emerging and disruptive technologies.” I spent three months at TILT in 2012, as a visiting researcher, during my PhD studies. I highly recommend this experience – it’s one of the best environments there are to develop your research in the field of data protection/privacy.

 

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As for the weekend reads proposed this week, they tackle hot topics: human rights and encryption from a global perspective, international trade agreements and data protection from the EU law perspective, newsworthiness and the protection of privacy in the US.  

 

  1. Human rights and encryption, by Wolfgang Schultz and Joris van Hoboken, published by UNESCO.

“This study focuses on the availability and use of a technology of particular significance in the field of information and communication: encryption, or more broadly cryptography. Over the last decades, encryption has proven uniquely suitable to be used in the digital environments. It has been widely deployed by a variety of actors to ensure protection of information and communication for commercial, personal and public interests. From a human rights perspective, there is a growing recognition that the availability and deployment of encryption by relevant actors is a necessary ingredient for realizing a free and open internet. Specifically, encryption can support free expression, anonymity, access to information, private communication and privacy. Therefore, limitations on encryption need to be carefully scrutinized. This study addresses the relevance of encryption to human rights in the media and communications field, and the legality of interferences, and it offers recommendations for state practice and other stakeholders.”

2. “Trade and Privacy: Complicated Bedfellows? How to Achieve Data Protection-Proof Free Trade Agreements“, by Kristina Irion, Svetlana Yakovleva, Marija Bartl, a study commissioned by the European Consumer Organisation/Bureau Européen des Unions de Consommateurs (BEUC), Center for Digital Democracy (CDD), The Transatlantic Consumer Dialogue (TACD) and European Digital Rights (EDRi).

“This independent study assesses how EU standards on privacy and data protection are safeguarded from liberalisation by existing free trade agreements (the General Agreement of Trade in Services (GATS) and the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA)) and those that are currently under negotiation (the Trans-atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA)). Based on the premise that the EU does not negotiate its privacy and data protection standards, the study clarifies safeguards and risks in respectively the EU legal order and international trade law. In the context of the highly-charged discourse surrounding the new generation free trade agreements under negotiation, this study applies legal methods in order to derive nuanced conclusions about the preservation of the EU’s right to regulate privacy and the protection of personal data.”

3. “Making News: Balancing Newsworthiness and Privacy in the Age of Algorithms, by Erin C. Caroll, published by the Georgetown University Law Center.

“In deciding privacy lawsuits against media defendants, courts have for decades deferred to the media. They have given it wide berth to determine what is newsworthy and so, what is protected under the First Amendment. And in doing so, they have often spoken reverently of the editorial process and journalistic decision-making.

Yet, in just the last several years, news production and consumption has changed dramatically. As we get more of our news from digital and social media sites, the role of information gatekeeper is shifting from journalists to computer engineers, programmers, and app designers. The algorithms that the latter write and that underlie Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other platforms are not only influencing what we read but are prompting journalists to approach their craft differently.

While the Restatement (Second) of Torts says that a glance at any morning newspaper can confirm what qualifies as newsworthy, this article argues that the modern-day corollary (which might involve a glance at a Facebook News Feed) is not true. If we want to meaningfully balance privacy and First Amendment rights, then courts should not be so quick to defer to the press in privacy tort cases, especially given that courts’ assumptions about how the press makes newsworthiness decisions may no longer be accurate. This article offers several suggestions for making better-reasoned decisions in privacy cases against the press.”

Enjoy the reads and have a nice weekend!

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